Autonomous Maintenance

[tweetmeme source=”leanisgood” service=”ow.ly”]Autonomous Maintenance, one of the 6-8 pillars of TPM. This is where most implementations I have seen or been a part of begin. I am sure you have heard the usual buzzwords of TPM is a culture change, it’s not a program, slogram, flavor of the current administration. Yes it should be a culture change and TPM should avoid all of the other partially successful quality initiatives that have been doomed in your facility. Continue reading

Introducing Kim Galizio

The Lean Is Good Blog welcomes Kim Galizio.  Kim has an extensive background in TPM, Autonomous Maintenance, and maintenance in lean organizations.  He is an apprenticeship trained pipe fitter and an accomplished amateur guitarist.  He introduced to me to the new paradigm about 16 years ago.  Kim’s inaugural post is here.

Bruce

Hoshin Kanri and Metrics: Make it Personal

[tweetmeme source=”leanisgood” service=”ow.ly”]When discussing Policy Deployment, one of the challenges is linking the vision / Mission to daily activities across the organization. One must capture the essence of the organization as well as understand what I do impacts the overall business. It also must matter to the associates. How can this be done? You need to get creative and have the associates / team members help with the process. Continue reading

Gemba Walks…Don’t Forget to Teach!

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We’ve all experienced the importance of gemba walks and know they are an absolute necessity for a lean enterprise.  There are many posts and sights that detail this importance for a transformation and also speak about “good” gemba walk practices.  However, there are a few bad habits that I find myself and others slipping into quite easily. Continue reading

News Flash, Lean Is Good — for Fashion

Outsourcing May Be Slowing Down Apparel Firms | Marguerite Rigoglioso | Stanford Graduate School of Business News.

[tweetmeme source=”leanisgood” service=”ow.ly”]  I found an article on the Stanford Graduate School of Business News site written by Marguerite Rigoglioso reviewing research done by Gerard Cachon of Wharton and Robert Swinney of Stanford Graduate School of Business.  The title, Outsourcing May Be Slowing Down Apparel Firms caught my eye because I like to see “outsourcing” and “slowing” Continue reading

Watching the Border: Customer Confusion and Respect for Humanity

[tweetmeme source=”leanisgood” service=”ow.ly”]Steve Kroft from 60 minutes reported on the US border security with Mexico on Sunday, January 10th. Once again it was basically revealling the inability of the US government and Corporate America to create elegant solutions to difficult problems and the waste of time and dollars. What viewers saw was no different from other reports from 60 minutes but a couple of things struck me as I watched. Continue reading

Pinewood Derby Cars, Standard Work and Training

[tweetmeme source="leanisgood" service="ow.ly"]It is Pinewood Derby Car season and working with a 6 year old who wants to use a coping saw, spray paint, and lead weights just sends chills down my spine. One thing that is helping get me through this process without a mental meltdown or trip to the hospital is reflecting on how a new associate, the 6 year old mentioned above, and I, the supposed reasonable adult or Supervisor go through the derby car making process and how Standard Work and training would help the manufacture of the car, calm my nerves, and make a more enjoyable experience for everyone. Continue reading

Andon Calls and Muri

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I’m currently working my way through Mike Rother’s book Toyota Kata.  A formal review will follow in the future as I’m approximately half done but I can already say there are many great insights into TPS.  However, one of the insights has sparked up an old fire that I always seem to struggle with understanding as I have never been employed by Toyota.

Mike talks about how a Toyota assembly plant was staffed to handle about 1,000 andon calls per shift and they became very concerned when the calls dropped to 700 per shift.  Toyota found that this could only mean two things:  Continue reading

Lean – Sigma, Equal?

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Many folks today are preaching lean-sigma, a blend of lean manufacturing and six sigma ideals.  One of the blogs I enjoy reading, The Lean Manufacturing Blog, recently had a post (here) talking about integrating the two. Continue reading

Undercover Boss – Going to the Gemba on CBS

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Genchi gembutsu.  Go to the gemba.  The importance of going to the ‘actual place’ to see the ‘actual thing.’  It’s something that lean practitioners value a lot.  CBS’s new reality show, Undercover Boss, premiering on February 7th after the Superbowl is where corporate leaders do just that – the voyeuristic ritual of reality shows goes lean? Continue reading

Competition Among Peers – Deming’s Third Deadly Disease

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Last week I did a posts here and here (and Bryan offered a different paradigm here) about the external motivation (carrot and stick) assumption of many performance evaluation / merit pay systems.  We’re calling this the “jackass series”.

Let’s talk about another assumption that underlies many of these systems – competition between peers increases productivity and effectiveness.  The effort to create competition can take on many forms.  Differential bonuses or annual increases, or forced rankings of peers.  Some go so far as to force somebody in the group to be put in a category like “needs improvement” or “C”.  In some of the most extreme systems people are “let go” Continue reading

Performance Appraisals – A Better Way?

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As Bruce points in a couple recent post (here and here), it is performance appraisal season.  Bruce provided many great points on how they are used for evil instead of good!  But we all aren’t as lucky as Deming and can’t just conscientiously object.  In reality most of our jobs require us to perform some type of annual evaluation.  What can you do to take the “jackassery” out of them and avoid crossing over to the dark side? Continue reading

Happy New Year from the People of Lean Is Good

Bryan, Scott, and I wish you a happy, safe, and prosperous 2010.  We would also like to thank you for the attention that you have given us and the thoughts and ideas that you have shared with us on this blog.

Bruce

New Year’s Resolution – Do Less

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When you reflect on this year you probably see busyness replacing effectiveness, mixed priorities instead of a constant mission and doing more instead of doing important or vital.

The challenge is for next year that instead of a new year’s resolution to lose weight or learn a new language you first decide what you are going to stop doing. What are your principles, values, beliefs? What are you doing on a weekly or daily basis that does not fit these beliefs? Continue reading