22 Rules, Respecting Humanity?

[tweetmeme source=”leanisgood” service=”ow.ly” only_single=false]I recently read a plant newsletter that list 22 keys to forklift safety. Twenty-two.  Many of these are pretty intuitive and are pretty easy to remember if not somewhat ‘natural’ to someone who is used to operating any motor vehicle.  Some forklift operators will probably read this list of rules and integrate a couple of these keys into their behaviors – they will learn something they will retain on an intuitive level.  The bigger question isn’t really about forklift safety though.  The bigger question goes to the idea of 22 rules. Continue reading

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Respect for People – Corrective Actions

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We recently came across a situation in a very long cycle time process. During the “automatic” process an operator is to check the status of the operation every 30 minutes and make any corrections for process deviations.   Now that we are focusing on this process, we created a plan to poka yoke the system so that we don’t have to rely on an operator remembering to check every half hour, Continue reading

Another Interesting Poka Yoke

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Last week Bryan posted about a poka yoke (error proofing) that he found when he bought a kitchen table (here.)  Today I received a piece of office furniture and was frustrated when I looked at the instructions (I read instructions when on company time – I only follow my y chromosome driven instinct to disregard instruction until after I have screwed something up on my time.)  The instructions showed that the back of the chair should be attached to the seat of the chair with a socket head cap screw, a flat washer, and a lock washer.  What was not clear was what went where?  Continue reading

Interesting Poka Yoke

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We bought a new kitchen table yesterday and found an interesting mistake proofing system for all the nuts, bolts, and washers that are needed for assembly.  They were in a bag that was put inside a bigger red bag.  The top of the red bag was twisted Continue reading